Bookmarks: 5 Interesting Articles That May Help You This Week

October 29th, 2018

Each week, I select a few articles that rise above the fray and hopefully help you on your journey in the CRE world. They pull from one of four “corners:” corporate real estate, technology, management science and anything positive. I welcome your comments on these articles.

Credit: iStock

How to Mitigate Rising Construction Materials Costs

“Construction costs are increasing rapidly. Some developers have said that total construction costs are up 30% over last year. A lot is contributing to the rising construction price tag, but a labor shortage and rising materials prices are among the biggest drivers. Now, trade tariffs on steel and lumber are putting more pressure on construction costs. While there is little developers can do to curb these increases, implementing materials management technology is one way to offset it..” www.globest.com

The Amazon Selling Machine

A computer screen showing Amazon's Australia homepageQUINNROONEY / GETTY

“What if there were a company that knew what you wanted to buy before you did? What if it made shopping recommendations that tapped into your deepest desires? Better yet, what if it then made buying completely seamless? Would you ever stop shopping?

Amazon shareholders may like the answers to those questions. The company that revolutionized the way we buy has now gotten serious about selling the ads that tell us what to buy in the first place. It is selling advertising on Amazon.com, encouraging brands to create Alexa “skills” so they can market to people when they’re at home, and putting targeted ads on the main screens of its Amazon Kindles, tablets, and televisions. And it’s attracting money that brands used to spend on Facebook and Google.” www.theatlantic.com 

Jeff Bezos’s Morning Routine Is the Opposite of Most Productivity Advice. Maybe Yours Should Be Too

Jeff Bezos
CREDIT: Getty Images

“Elon Musk seems to get most of his sleep under his desk. Richard Branson recommends getting up at 5 a.m. Apple’s Tim Cook takes being an early riser even further, getting up at the ungodly hour of 3:45 a.m. And once these and other titans of industry are up, they’re usually busy with productivity-boosting activities like exercise, journaling, and meditation, reports time-use expert Laura Vanderkam.

Not Jeff Bezos.

As you can see in the interview below (hat tip to Signal v. Noise), he insists on a full night’s sleep and spends his leisurely mornings … puttering? Yes, that’s right. The world’s richest man skips heroic productivity rituals for breakfast with his kids and a slow morning warm up. He doesn’t get fully up to speed mentally until 10 a.m.’ www.inc.com

What I Learned About Life at My 30th College Reunion

Though we all went to the same school, and Harvard’s name likely opened doors for many of us, at the end of the day—or at the end of 30 years since graduation, in this case—what was so fascinating about meeting up with my own richly diverse class during reunion was that no matter our original background, no matter our current income or skin color or struggles or religion or health or career path or family structure, the common threads running through our lives had less to do with Harvard and more with the pressing issues of being human.

Life does this. To everyone. No matter if or where they go to college. At a certain point midway on the timeline of one’s finite existence, the differences between people that stood out in youth take a backseat to similarities, with that mother of all universal themes—a sudden coming to grips with mortality—being the most salient. Not that this is an exhaustive list, but here are 30 simple shared truths I discovered at my 30th reunion of Harvard’s class of 1988.” www.theatlantic.com

Credit Lars Leetaru

“With fares, tips, and bonuses factored in, I average around $20 an hour and give around 75 rides per week,” said Jon Sycamore, a driver in Salt Lake City who also runs a real estate business. “If you remove tips, it drops to around $15 an hour.” By comparison, Salt Lake City’s living wage is $11.48 an hour for a single adult and $24.12 an hour for a single adult with a child. www.NYTimes.com

 

Your success blesses others. I wish you a great a hugely impactful week!

Bookmarks: 5 Interesting Articles That May Help You This Week

October 22nd, 2018

Each week, I select a few articles that rise above the fray and hopefully help you on your journey in the CRE world. They pull from one of four “corners:” corporate real estate, technology, management science and anything positive. I welcome your comments on these articles.

How This Millennial Came To Realize The Value Of Old-School Management

“I’ve worked in some pretty challenging environments in the past, ranging from mind-numbingly boring to outright hostile. Back then, I promised myself that if I ever had my own company, it would be different.

I kept that promise to myself once I started BodeTree, working hard to create a progressive, modern workplace for my team. My goal was to foster an environment where people were free from micromanagement and encouraged to find creative solutions to difficult problems.

The hope was that my Laissez-Faire management style would bring out the best in my team and enable them to thrive. I was arrogant enough to scoff at the ideas of “old-school” managers, content with my morally-superior approach.

My progressive approach ended up causing more problems than I ever expected. Work didn’t get done, conflicts arose between team members, and frustration grew on all sides.

In dealing with these challenges, I came to a startling conclusion: “old-school” management techniques not only work; they’re vital to the success of an organization.

Trust, but verify

One of my favorite quotes comes from President Reagan, in response to dealing with the Soviets. “Trust but verify,” was his mantra. In the past, I’ve been heavy on the trust, but far too light on the “verify” aspect of that equation. www.forbes.com

What Is the Future of Getting Kids to Soccer Practice?

“Each company in the industry tends to pursue a similar group of people: well-off families with two time-starved working parents and multiple overbooked children. “Kids can make it on time to the very best rowing practice, math tutoring, and fencing class,” says Kate Soskil, the marketing manager of the Massachusetts-based Sheprd, as she described the company’s target customers, “and Mom/Dad can stay late at the office for that important meeting that’s running over.” Juliette Kayyem, the CEO of Zemcar, told me that “divorced dads are actually a big customer base for us.”

If only children were allowed to drive, they could get from home to school to piano lessons and back home again without their parents’ help. Alas, they are not.

These companies are effectively trying to replace carpools and school buses, and the majority of them were launched in the past two to five years. Arun Sundararajan, a professor at NYU’s Stern School of Business and the author of The Sharing Economy: The End of Employment and the Rise of Crowd-Based Capitalism, says he attributes the boomlet to the rapid rise of Uber and Lyft during that time: Those two companies proved the viability of on-demand rides, but since their terms of service prohibited minors from riding unaccompanied, there was room for kid-specific firms to claim some of the market. In carving out this niche, these companies have been decidedly less cutthroat in their business practices, and because so many of them seek drivers with professional caregiving experience, many of those drivers are women.” www.theatlantic.com 

“..it makes sense to tip your driver because they are providing a personal service which involves safety and comfort, and our cultural norm is to tip those who provide this kind of service. She pointed out that this norm will vary in overseas markets. “In Europe the tipping expectations would be lower, and many passengers would simply ’round up’ the bill. And don’t even think about tipping any driver in Japan — that would be considered rude,” she said.

Both Uber and Lyft limit their tip amount to 200 percent. So you wouldn’t be able to leave a $15 tip for your $5 Uber ride if you were feeling extra generous — at least not on the app. The companies put a ceiling on this to keep passengers from accidentally adding an extra zero and overtipping.

Whether you give your driver cash or just tip through the app, they receive 100 percent of the tip; Uber, Lyft, Gett and Via don’t take a cut. Generally, drivers are just happy to get a tip, Mr. Helling said, and many don’t have a preference for cash versus tipping directly in the app. Still, if you have the cash on hand, it can’t hurt to ask.” www.nytimes.com

How To Invest Your $1.6 Billion Mega Millions Winnings

“You still couldn’t buy an NFL team or an NBA franchise. Those are reserved for the multi-billionaires, not somebody who has a mere $687 million. Nonetheless, you could still afford most of life’s extravagances. Once you have shared the wealth with family members and your favorite charities, you would eventually have to get down to the business of investing your windfall. Don’t worry; there would be plenty advisors knocking at your door with all sorts of ideas. Help is only a 1% fee away, after all. But if you are more of DIY investor (which most likely would change with $687 million to your name), here are a few suggestions to get you started.” www.forbes.com

This is the Easiest Way to Make Your LinkedIn Profile Stand Out

“There’s a simple solution to this–customize your headline. Instead of meekly recording your title and company, try following the tried-and-true strategy of describing what you do and who you help. This is your elevator pitch in 120 characters.” www.fastcompany.com

Your success blesses others. I wish you a great a hugely impactful week!

Bookmarks: 5 Interesting Articles That May Help You This Week

October 15th, 2018

Each week, I select a few articles that rise above the fray and hopefully help you on your journey in the CRE world. They pull from one of four “corners:” corporate real estate, technology, management science and anything positive. I welcome your comments on these articles.

Credit: iStock

Three Behaviors That Can Help You Mature From Boss To Leader

Become a leader.PHOTO BY ROB WALSH ON UNSPLASH

“One of the most embarrassing mistakes I made early on at BodeTree was believing that the title of CEO automatically made me a leader.  It didn’t

I had power, but had yet to earn my authority. Thought I fancied myself a leader, I was just a boss. It took years of mistakes, struggles, and hard realizations for that to change.

You see, anyone can be a boss, but relatively few have the drive, patience, or stamina to become a true leader. Leadership does not require a title, and titles do not make leaders. There is no such thing as a born leader. There are, however, people who possess the self-awareness necessary to mature into one.” www.forbes.com

I Took A Rare Look Inside One of Amazon’s Giant Warehouses – Here’s What I Saw

“The looming, beige facility feels removed from the shiny, glamorous headquarters that Amazon is still building in the center of the city to house its corporate employees. Large open fields stretch in one direction, and suburban houses are in the other. In the distance, you can catch a glimpse of Mount Rainier.

The setting is almost picturesque — until you remember that before you is an Amazon fulfillment center that spans nearly 1 million square feet. Inside, Amazon workers spend 10 hours a day, four days a week, ensuring your order gets to you on time.” www.businessinsider.com 

9 Phrases Smart People Never Use In Conversation

Shutterstock

We’ve all said things that people interpreted much differently than we thought they would. These seemingly benign comments lead to the awful feeling that only comes when you’ve planted your foot firmly into your mouth.

Verbal slip-ups often occur because we say things without knowledge of the subtle implications they carry. Understanding these implications requires social awareness—the ability to pick up on the emotions and experiences of other people.

TalentSmart has tested the emotional intelligence (EQ) of more than a million people and discovered that social awareness is a skill in which many of us are lacking.

We lack social awareness because we’re so focused on what we’re going to say next—and how what other people are saying affects us—that we completely lose sight of other people.” www.forbes.com

Sears Exit Would Leave Big Holes in Malls. Some Landlords Welcome That. [WSJ Paywall]

“The rent Sears pays in some malls is as low as $4 a square foot. New tenants in the same space could bring in as much as six times that amount.” www.forbes.com

The Boring Path to Greatness

“In our work, we must endure the unglamorous. We must put in the time. We must attend the meetings we really don’t feel like attending. We must do the market research. We must take the red-eye. And we must do it over and over again.

There is a certain boredom to it. And everyone struggles with it. But the wonderful paradox is this: greatness emerges from boredom. It comes from doing the boring, tedious things required of us, day in and day out.

Perseverance is not a new concept. But it’s one that I need to keep priming myself on. I need to remind myself that my true potential will be reached only through overcoming obstacles, and continuing on the path.” www.linkedin.com

Your success blesses others. I wish you a great a hugely impactful week!

Bookmarks: 5 Interesting Articles That May Help You This Week

October 8th, 2018

Each week, I select a few articles that rise above the fray and hopefully help you on your journey in the CRE world. They pull from one of four “corners:” corporate real estate, technology, management science and anything positive. I welcome your comments on these articles.

Credit: iStock

How Winning Organizations Last 100 Years

“The average lifespan of a U.S. S&P 500 company has fallen by 80% in the last 80 years (from 67 to 15 years), and 76% of UK FTSE 100 companies have disappeared in the last 30 years. In stark contrast, organizations in other sectors celebrate their 100th birthday and look like they’ll be here forever. How do they do it? And what can business learn from them?” www.hbr.org

“The unemployment rate fell to a nearly five-decade low in September, punctuating a remarkable rebound in the 10 years since the collapse of Lehman Brothers set off a global financial crisis.

By almost any measure, the American economy is humming. Gross domestic product is on pace for its best year since the housing bubble of the mid-2000s. Consumers and businesses are the most confident they have been in years, if not decades. Stock market indexes are near record highs.” www.nytimes.com

Research: Career Hot Streaks Can Happen at Any Age

“What do our findings mean for professionals and the ecosystems they inhabit? In the scientific community, for example, projected impact is critical for hiring, advancement, grant-making, and other decisions. But the same is true of most domains, including business. Our research suggests that decision-makers should consider incorporating the notion of hot streaks into their calculus, if polices are to identify and nurture individuals more likely to have lasting impact.” www.hbr.org 

PropTech: What the Fuss Is All About

PropTech is a collective term used to define startups offering technologically innovative products or new business models for the real estate markets. The real estate industry will without a doubt be the next sector to experience a tsunami sized technological overhaul. Hell, it’s already begun.” www.thelawyerspost.com

Important Commercial Real Estate Terms You Should Know

“Commercial real estate is far more complex than residential real estate. The contracts are longer, often the price tags are higher, and included in the process are many complex terms that an ordinary person does not understand. Make sure before entering into a commercial real estate deal you are aware of these terms.” www.forbes.com

Your success blesses others. I wish you a great a hugely impactful week!

 

Bookmarks: 5 Interesting Articles That May Help You This Week

October 1st, 2018

Each week, I select a few articles that rise above the fray and hopefully help you on your journey in the CRE world. They pull from one of four “corners:” corporate real estate, technology, management science and anything positive. I welcome your comments on these articles.

Credit: iStock

Why Companies Are Creating Their Own Coworking Spaces

“It’s typically assumed these companies are seeking a jolt of hipness. But our research and reporting show this isn’t the case. We’ve separately toured and interviewed principals in more than a dozen corporate coworking spaces in the U.S., South America, and Europe over the last three years. We’ve found that these companies and their employees are searching for the same qualities freelancers and entrepreneurs report from their experiences in shared workspaces — learning skills faster, making more connections, and feeling inspired and in control.” www.hbr.org

The Economics Of The Office: Why Do We Still Commute?

“Part of the story, Glaeser says, is that “Macrae didn’t foresee the rise of the consumer city, the fact that millions of people would actually want to locate in London or New York—not just because there are jobs there—but because it was fun.” The other part of the story is that, far from killing the urban office, computers invigorated it with new forms of work that made it even more profitable.” www.psmag.com

The Next Industrial Revolution: How A Tech Unicorn’s 3-D Metal Printers Could Remake Manufacturing

“The way we make things is about to fundamentally change,” says Desktop Metal’s Ric Fulop.

“The way we make things is about to fundamentally change,” says Desktop Metal’s Ric Fulop. MICHAEL PRINCE

“Only a few years ago, proponents envisioned a world in which hobbyists would buy little 3-D printers for their homes. That never really panned out. The $3,000 machines spit out cheap-looking, clunky plastic objects that no one wanted or needed. Instead, it’s now clear that the real value of 3-D printing isn’t in making keychains and other doodads, but in the $12.8 trillion global manufacturing industry. Putting 3-D printers on the assembly line will usher in a new era in which smaller factories, located closer to consumers and tied together by software, can print parts on demand with no minimum order size. Better yet, it’s possible to design parts that are lighter, cheaper and more efficient than what could have been fabricated in the past.” www.forbes.com

How To Build A Floating Bridge in 12 Minutes 

“In ideal conditions, a trained crew can build a 100-foot bridge (that’s with two ramp bays and three interior bays) in about 12 minutes. “Ideal” here means calm water that’s at least 2 feet deep, with a shallow bank and plenty of room to maneuver. But war zones and natural disaster areas are not what you’d call ideal conditions, so the 132nd Multirole Bridge Company trains for as many situations as possible. Not that they can prepare for everything.” www.wired.com

An Oral History of Apple’s Infinite Loop

Last month, Apple became the first company valued at a trillion dollars. With its new ring-shaped campus, all glass and curvy lines, it looks the part of a company bestriding an industry. But its dominance wasn’t always assured.
Twenty-five years ago, the computer revolution’s marquee company was in decline. Back then, it was just settling into shiny new headquarters, a campus of six buildings that formed a different kind of ring. Called Infinite Loop, the name is a reference to a well-known programming error—code that gets stuck in an endless repetition—though no one seems to know who applied it. Infinite Loop was the place where Apple’s leaders and engineers pulled off a historic turnaround, and it will always be the source of stories and legends—many of them untold. Until now.” www.wired.com

Your success blesses others. I wish you a great a hugely impactful week!

 

Bookmarks: 5 Interesting Articles That May Help You This Week

September 17th, 2018

Each week, I select a few articles that rise above the fray and hopefully help you on your journey in the CRE world. They pull from one of four “corners:” corporate real estate, technology, management science and anything positive. I welcome your comments on these articles.

Credit: iStock

How to Protect Your Cellphone (and Your Data) When You Travel

“Many travelers consider their cellphones essential when they’re on the road and rely on it for taking pictures and texting to using it to find their way around.

So what do you do if your phone gets lost, stolen or breaks when you’re abroad? How can you prevent it from happening in the first place? Brandon Bogle, a cellphone expert for Asurion, a company that provides insurance for consumer electronics, has plenty of advice on the subject and shares his tips below.” www.nytimes.com

I Made One Simple Financial Change and It Lowered My Spending: After reporting on personal finance, I used behavioral economics on myself

“A few years ago, when I was reporting a story on personal finance, I became fascinated by a concept that behavioral economists call the “pain of paying.” The phrase refers to the psychological discomfort experienced when parting with one’s money, and it varies by medium: At one extreme would be painstakingly counting out each penny at the register (a high pain of paying, because of how tactile the transaction is), and near the other would be credit cards (which, by postponing payment and offering rewards programs, ease the agony of depleting funds).” www.theatlantic.com

The New Rolodex: Your Web Of Support Is Critical To Success

“Regardless of what you call this support system – your Rolodex, personal board of directors, your network – quality mentoring relationships have powerful, positive effects on young people across personal, academic, and professional situations. According to MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership, mentoring can create important personal growth and development, as well as social and economic opportunity.” www.forbes.com

The Open Office Concept: Science Still Can’t Decide If It’s Good For Us

“The open office concept, it seems, is still open to debate.

A study published in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine this month found that workers in open offices are less stressed and more active than cubicle workers, perhaps because they move around more to interact with colleagues.

At the same time, past research, like that published by Harvard researchers in July, has found that people who work in open offices are less likely than cubicle dwellers to collaborate or interact with their colleagues.

Though the studies didn’t examine the exact same factors, their outcomes seem to send mixed messages, proving—if nothing else—that science has yet to give us a clear-cut verdict on open office plans.” www.fortune.com

After 17 Years, Memories Of 9/11 Still Fresh For Atlanta’s CRE Industry

Pleased to be included in this article: “At the same time, Cushman & Wakefield Executive Director Ken Ashley was working at One Atlantic Center, one of Atlanta’s tallest skyscrapers. Ashley said he heard murmurs of a plane hitting the Twin Towers on the way up the elevator, but the details were unclear and confusing. When he got to his office, he immediately fired up his web browser to CNN.com. “And it wouldn’t load,” Ashley said. “That’s when I began to realize that there was something bigger than just your average everyday problem.”

Your success blesses others. I wish you a great a hugely impactful week!

Bookmarks: 5 Interesting Articles That May Help You This Week

September 9th, 2018

Each week, I select a few articles that rise above the fray and hopefully help you on your journey in the CRE world. They pull from one of four “corners:” corporate real estate, technology, management science and anything positive. I welcome your comments on these articles.

Credit: iStock

Habits Of Mentally Strong People, And How They Can Help You Succeed

“The first productive thing that mentally tough people do is wake up in the morning and get out of bed. They go to bed and wake up early so that they are clearheaded to accomplish the jobs at hand. They don’t hit the snooze button 10 times because they have been out late at night partying. Nor do they hide under the covers ruminating about past failures, things that have gone wrong in their lives or obsessively mull over past slights and humiliations. They summon up the strength to block out any negativity and get out of bed at an early hour.  Mentally strong people already have a game plan prepared for what they will do that day. They already know the tasks at hand and get started right away. It doesn’t necessarily mean that they are happy about everything they need to do, but they attack it anyway.

Mentally strong people face the day unafraid of failure. They understand that failing is part of the process. It is a learning experience for them. They take notes and learn lessons of what not to do in the future. Even if they fail, usually they will have learned some new skills to use in future plans. These folks will brush themselves off, get up and start all over again. Of course, they are not giddy with enjoyment that things didn’t turn out the way they wanted, but it doesn’t ruin them emotionally.” www.forbes.com

The Open Office Concept: Science Still Can’t Decide If It’s Good For US

“The open office concept, it seems, is still open to debate.

A study published in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine this month found that workers in open offices are less stressed and more active than cubicle workers, perhaps because they move around more to interact with colleagues.

At the same time, past research, like that published by Harvard researchers in July, has found that people who work in open offices are less likely than cubicle dwellers to collaborate or interact with their colleagues.

Though the studies didn’t examine the exact same factors, their outcomes seem to send mixed messages, proving—if nothing else—that science has yet to give us a clear-cut verdict on open office…” www.fortune.com

The #1 Office Perk? Natural Light

“…a new survey by my HR advisory firm Future Workplace called “The Employee Experience” reveals the reality is that employees crave something far more fundamental and essential to human needs. In a research poll of 1,614 North American employees, we found that access to natural light and views of the outdoors are the number one attribute of the workplace environment, outranking stalwarts like onsite cafeterias, fitness centers, and premium perks including on-site childcare (only 4-8% of FORTUNE 100 companies offer on-site child care).

The study also found that the absence of natural light and outdoor views hurts the employee experience. Over a third of employees feel that they don’t get enough natural light in their workspace. 47% of employees admit they feel tired or very tired from the absence of natural light or a window at their office, and 43% report feeling gloomy because of the lack of light.” www.hbr.org

[WSJ paywall] Walmart Tries Out Own Home-Delivery Service

“Walmart Inc. is testing its own network of independent delivery drivers as it aims to offer home grocery delivery to 100 metro areas by the end of the year. The retail giant said Wednesday it will begin using Spark Delivery, a crowd-sources delivery drivers network named after Walmart’s yellow star logo, to accomplish its grocery delivery goals.” www.wsj.com

Facebook Is Bingeing on Bay Area Real Estate

“Since Facebook Inc. arrived in Menlo Park, California, seven years ago, the town has been overrun by construction cranes, orange safety cones and truckloads of building materials to transform a former industrial area into a sprawling campus that can support a $500 billion tech giant.

So big are the ambitions that the company plans to redevelop whole swaths of the land it holds in the Silicon Valley city, potentially doubling its workforce there over the next decade to 35,000 people—more than Menlo Park’s current population.

Even that won’t be enough for its expansion plans.

“We continue to grow,” John Tenanes, the company’s head of facilities, said in a conference room overlooking a salt marsh in Facebook’s newest Menlo Park office, a Frank Gehry-designed building called MPK 21 that opened last week. “We’re at a point where we needed more space, and this area couldn’t keep up.” www.bloomberg.com

Your success blesses others. I wish you a great a hugely impactful week!

Bookmarks: 5 Interesting Articles That May Help You This Week

September 4th, 2018

Each week, I select a few articles that rise above the fray and hopefully help you on your journey in the CRE world. They pull from one of four “corners:” corporate real estate, technology, management science and anything positive. I welcome your comments on these articles.

Credit: iStock

WeShip? | UPS Launches On-Demand Warehouse and Fulfillment Platform

As online shoppers become more insistent on fast, free shipping, the pressure is on shippers to store and fulfill orders closer to their ultimate destination. At the same time, available warehouse space has been dropping steadily for years. And for smaller shippers, multiple warehouse contracts, if they can be found, can be too much to afford and manage.

Furthermore, even medium to large companies with seasonal spikes in business often struggle to find seasonal space or own space that is underused most of the year.

New sharing-economy services seek to solve this problem by matching warehouses and merchants based on the products, order volume, space requirements and delivery needs.  www.supplychaindive.com

The 14 Most Active VC Investors in US Real Estate Tech

“The US real estate market is booming—and so is the real estate tech industry.

In 2008, businesses in the real estate tech space in the US brought in a total of $41 million across just seven deals, according to the PitchBook Platform. Contrast those numbers with what’s happening a decade later: So far in 2018, companies in the category have raised a total of $1.3 billion across 73 deals—and there are still four months left in the year.” www.pitchbook.com

8 Ways Generation Z Will Differ From Millennials In The Workplace

Generation Z is composed of those born between 1995 and 2010, which means that the oldest are about 22 and are just entering the workforce. The media has focused a lot on millennials in recent years, but it’s time to turn some of the attention to the millennials’ future co-workers. Gen Zers have a lot in common with millennials, but there are also many ways in which the two generations differ.” www.forbes.com

Solopreneurs Swear By These Tech Tools To Streamline And Get More Done

One of the keys to success is to surround yourself with people whose strengths are your weaknesses. You don’t have to be great at everything to be a successful entrepreneur, you simply have to recognize the things that aren’t your strengths and then find people who possess those skills and work with them to achieve your goals.

This is why freelancers are a great asset to any business. Without the budgets to hire a team in-house it can be tough to achieve the goals you have set for your business. But apps like Upwork allow you to tap into a whole world of skilled freelancers who are ready to work for you.” www.forbes.com

San Francisco is Bringing Back Banned Electric Scooters – With Limits

“The scooters are back in town.

Three months after ejecting the networks of shared, sidewalk-cluttering vehicles from the city, officials with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency announced today the two winners of its e-scooter pilot sweepstakes: Scoot and Skip.

The city chose the companies from a crowded field of 12, which submitted a collective 800 pages in proposals on their operations, safety, and plans to extend the scooter bounty to San Francisco’s neighborhoods. Skip and Scoot now have the right to operate at least 625 scooters each in the city—a number that could eventually double. Scooter lovers, mark your calendars: The agency says it will finalize the companies’ permits by October 15 at the latest. They’ll be good for a year.” www.wired.com

 

Your success blesses others. I wish you a great a hugely impactful week!

Bookmarks: 5 Interesting Articles That May Help You This Week

August 20th, 2018

Each week, I select a few articles that rise above the fray and hopefully help you on your journey in the CRE world. They pull from one of four “corners:” corporate real estate, technology, management science and anything positive. I welcome your comments on these articles.

Credit: iStock

Do Millennials Prefer Cities or Suburbs? Maybe Both.

With all that people get wrong about these people, maybe it should be no surprise that nobody can say for sure where they really want to live. Researchers have arrived at two different conclusions. One is the back-to-the-city thesis, which asserts that young adults prefer the bustle and diversity of the urban landscape to the fading suburban dream. The other argument holds that, secretly, Millennials prefer the suburbs; they just haven’t made it there yet, or they’re being overlooked. It’s the Laurel vs. Yanny debate tearing geography apart. www.citylab.com

“The Democratic former president decided not to join corporate boards or give speeches for big money because, he says, he didn’t want to “capitalize financially on being in the White House.”

Presidential historian Michael Beschloss said that Gerald Ford, Carter’s predecessor and close friend, was the first to fully take advantage of those high-paid post-presidential opportunities, but that “Carter did the opposite.”

Since Ford, other former presidents, and sometimes their spouses, routinely earn hundreds of thousands of dollars per speech.

“I don’t see anything wrong with it; I don’t blame other people for doing it,” Carter says over dinner. “It just never had been my ambition to be rich.” www.washingtonpost.com

Where Even Walmart Won’t Go: How Dollar General Took Over rural America

“Dollar General is opening stores at the rate of three a day across the US. It moves into places not even Walmart will go, targeting rural towns and damaged inner-city neighbourhoods with basic goods at basic prices – a strategy described by a former chief executive of the chain as “we went where they ain’t”.

The chain now has more outlets across the country than McDonald’s has restaurants, and its profits have surged past some of the grand old names of American retail. The company estimates that three-quarters of the population lives within five miles of one of its stores, which stock everything from groceries and household cleaners to clothes and tool.” www.theguardian.com

The Cognitive Biases Tricking Our Brains

“Present bias shows up not just in experiments, of course, but in the real world. Especially in the United States, people egregiously undersave for retirement—even when they make enough money to not spend their whole paycheck on expenses, and even when they work for a company that will kick in additional funds to retirement plans when they contribute.

That state of affairs led a scholar named Hal Hershfield to play around with photographs. Hershfield is a marketing professor at UCLA whose research starts from the idea that people are “estranged” from their future self. As a result, he explained in a 2011 paper, “saving is like a choice between spending money today or giving it to a stranger years from now.” The paper described an attemptby Hershfield and several colleagues to modify that state of mind in their students. They had the students observe, for a minute or so, virtual-reality avatars showing what they would look like at age 70. Then they asked the students what they would do if they unexpectedly came into $1,000. The students who had looked their older self in the eye said they would put an average of $172 into a retirement account. That’s more than double the amount that would have been invested by members of the control group, who were willing to sock away an average of only $80….” www.theatlantic.com

Tech Workers Call the Shots for Space

“With unemployment below 4%, companies are focusing on making smart decisions about their space– decisions that keep their employees happy and engaged,” said Revathi Greenwood, Americas head of research at Cushman & Wakefield. “Landlords are playing a critical role as well–ensuring their buildings stay competitive with a good mix of amenities and affordable parking, and of course concessions where necessary to attract top tenants.”

And not surprisingly, Millennials are driving a bulk of those decisions. Now the largest generation in the workforce, Millennials are driving the agendas of how companies operate, what workplaces look like and what technology is expected.” www.globest.com

Your success blesses others. I wish you a great a hugely impactful week!

Bookmarks: 5 Interesting Articles That May Help You This Week

July 30th, 2018

Each week, I select a few articles that rise above the fray and hopefully help you on your journey in the CRE world. They pull from one of four “corners:” corporate real estate, technology, management science and anything positive. I welcome your comments on these articles.

Credit: iStock

Here’s How America Uses Its Land

From sea to shining sea!

www.bloomberg.com

The 5-Hour Rule Used by Bill Gates, Jack Ma and Elon Musk

“Productivity expert Choncé Maddox writes, “It’s no secret that successful people read. The average millionaire is said to read two or more books per month.” As such, she suggests everyone “read blogs, news sites, fiction and non-fiction during downtime so you can soak in more knowledge.” If you’re frequently on the go, listen to audiobooks or podcasts.” www.entrepreneur.com

Her Company Was Growing, So Why Was It Failing?

[Podcast] “Just Between Friends is a nationwide franchise that runs consignment events. About a decade ago, it experienced a crazy jolt: It sold more franchise units than it ever had… and that fast growth nearly bankrupted the company. Why? Because here’s the difficult truth about growing a business: Not all growth is equal. Sometimes, growth in one part of your business can harm another part of your business. So to fix the problem, Just Between Friends had to hit pause and consider some very important questions: What’s the right way to grow? And what does it really take to get there?” www.forbes.com

The Freshest Ideas Are in Small Grocery Stores

“Most North Americans still buy their food at the classic supermarket, with its wide aisles and seemingly limitless choices. But stores like Kroger, the nation’s largest chain with more than $105 billion in sales in 2017, are being cannibalized by a host of discount competitors like Dollar General and Aldion one side, and by the growing dominance of Amazon and online delivery on the other.

“By and large, supermarkets are kind of behind the eight ball” in responding to changes in how people shop, said Diana Smith, the associate director of retail and apparel for the market research company Mintel.

Customers, especially younger ones, want stores that offer what some industry analysts have come to call “food experiences,” with craft beer on tap, meals to go and vegetable butchers. They tend to shop only when they cook, visiting more than one store to collect ingredients, rather than making a weekly trip to stock the pantry with toilet paper, chuck roast and gallons of milk.” www.nytimes.com

Truckers Looking to Haul in More Profits

[Paywall] “Trucking companies are hoping to turn the most robust freight market in a generation into stronger long-term financial footing.
Carriers are raising rates and investing in new equipment as a monthslong rally in transportation demand gives them the upper hand in setting prices with shippers.

Analysts expect strong results across the sector over the next two weeks as fleets report earnings. Capacity remains tight this summer, normally a slack period for freight, and some trucking companies are turning down loads for lack of available trucks.

“We should still see good margin performance from truckers,” said Brad Delco, a transportation analyst with Stephens Inc. “Supply-demand dynamics remain tight, and as a result pricing has been strong, partially offset by the need to raise driver wages.” www.wsj.com

Your success blesses others. I wish you a great a hugely impactful week!